Wednesday, December 27, 2017

The Art and Business of Writing by Chris Jones

Loved this book. So much helpful advice. Perfect size ... not too long and not too short. It even went beyond where I am in my career right now and took it to business cards and web hosting (I just use free Blogger and have for about 10 years) advice.



Here are some takeaways for me personally, and I have been writing for publication since about 2006 and ebooks since 2009. I know you'll get something great out of this book no matter how long you've been in the business!


  • Check out the Pomodoro timer in your phone's app store. Interesting to see how much work I was actually getting done versus how much time I THOUGHT I was spending working. It was much less, actually. Here's my post about discovering this helpful app!
  • This book made me realize that it would be doable for me to write 500 words per day if I made room in my life for that and did it first, BEFORE sitting down to my proofreading jobs. It's all about priorities.
  • The book is about the Art + Business of writing. To me that's like being good at English + Math, you know? You can't be all about the art of it ... because you also have to worry about record keeping, collections, getting clients, marketing and so much more!
  • Who is my reader? What do I hope they will learn and how will I help them? Like with my cookbooks, that's easy. And same for my book about making money to write for magazines. But my parenting Christmas and Halloweens? Kinda general and might need to be reworked into a more general holidays-with-kids book that's more focused on solutions.
  • Am I writing for them or for me? You have to somewhat write for yourself. Like most of my parenting articles were for me and same for the tater tot cookbook and even the magazine book I published was so I could compile all my markets, but then I wrote all the tips in the beginning for the reader! I put all the tater tot recipes in one place so I would have them for myself, but then I spiced them up and created more and added desserts! This gets me so excited to work on my other 8 projects I want to do, like this one!

What are some helpful things that work for you in your life as a writer?

Have files of article reprints that you own but have no clue where to start reselling them? Have ideas for some fantastic new pieces but no idea who might want them? Check out my 386-page PDF of tips, tricks, and insider information, as well as 384 paying parenting and family markets for only $9.99! Just head to this page to download How to Get Published (and Paid!) Writing About Your Kids and get started immediately!

Sign up for an email subscription to The Published Parent and get two amazing freebies: 10 Parenting Markets That Pay $100+ and 10 Markets That Pay Writers to Write About Writing! And join my Facebook group called Parenting Magazine Writers ... it's FREE and full of tips and tricks and markets and like-minded writer friends!

The Pomodoro Technique: Focus for ADHD Writers

I'm reading The Art and Business of Writing by Chris Jones on my Kindle and it's full of helpful advice. I'll review it in a later post. For now, please take this gem I got in there (then, interestingly enough, I also found the same gem the next day in a speed-reading ebook I was proofreading on Fiverr, which tells me the Universe wants me to try it).



Basically in the mornings, I put my butt in my seat after getting my coffee and something to eat. Focusing after that is hard. I want to check email, Facebook, my ebook sales, Fiverr, blog stats, do some blog social media, and more. Back and forth and then I've wasted an hour! That is no way to make your dreams come true of moving to the country, traveling the world with your family and writing a bunch more books! 


So you start by hitting the app store with your smartphone (or you can just do it yourself with a timer, I suppose, but I am trying out this free app to see if it keeps track of stats and stuff ... there are also paid versions).
Then you handle your settings. I left mine on the default. So I proofread for 25 minutes and then take a break. I plan to also use this for writing so I can get articles and ebooks actually WORKED ON! After every 4 sets, you get a longer break. I'll have to use this to switch out the laundry, do some dishes, throw dinner in the slow cooker, brush my teeth, get dressed, etc. I am only doing this in the mornings so far when the kids are sleeping and I am not distracted or interrupted. Once the kids are up, all bets are off and it's homeschool and family time until I can get more work done at night, usually about another hour until my brain is too tired to think.


The timer goes quietly for 25 minutes and then buzzes or can go off with an alarm with noise and then switches to 4 minutes of break (yes, you can pause it if you need to). Sometimes I might grab my 5-pound weights I keep by my desk (a 1950s Formica table in the corner of the kitchen, my "office") or do some planks or squats. Or check email. But the point is when that time is up I have to get back to work. No more languishing in Facebook land for me!



I'd love to hear about your tips, tricks and tools for getting things done! And be sure to come back to read my review of Chris Jones' book! You'll love it!

Check out my 386-page PDF of tips, tricks, and insider information, as well as 384 paying markets for only $19.99! Just head to this page :-) I wish you success!



You can sign up for an email subscription to this site and get a free sample of the book, including FIVE markets that pay $50 plus for reprints! Please also consider joining my Facebook group called Parenting Magazine Writers ... it's FREE and full of tips and tricks and markets and like-minded writer friends!

Thursday, October 19, 2017

Can You Consistently Write 500 Words a Day?



THE DREAM
Imagine if you could crank out 500 words every single day. Let's say you were working on parenting magazine articles. You could easily get one article done every week (1,000 words is a long one) with time to edit, research, then submit. Every. Single. Week. That's 52 articles a year working for you as passive-ish (you still have to send invoices)/residual income in the form of REPRINTS.

This could also translate into several blog posts per week (one day to get those 500 words out and one day to edit/research/create graphics).

This could also mean 50 days to 25,000 words of a book. Even if you then take another 50 days to work on a cover, get the book proofread, make sure it is all coherent, etc., you have a book in 100 days.

Let's say you're a blogger AND a magazine writer AND a book author. In just ONE YEAR, how many books, blog posts and articles could you knock out if you could just make sure to sit down and get 500 words written every day?

THE PROBLEM
Time. Time is always the problem. And interruptions. And life in general, intruding with its obligations like laundry and dishes and cooking and hygiene and weddings and funerals and parties and errands and clogged toilets and car problems. Oh, and sometimes also those cute children running around and also sometimes that pesky little thing called a full-time job that pays the bills while we chase our writing dreams. And yes, I do realize that even when my kids are grown and gone from the house, I will still have lots going on pertaining to them.

THE SOLUTION

Have you tried dictation using your smartphone? Not some fancy machine and not even some fancy app. I'm just talking about maybe using the Notes app on your iPhone that comes pre-installed. I am a huge fan of walking outside for my FitBit steps while writing at the same time by dictating my articles and books. I feel super amazing on those evenings when my 8-year-old has soccer practice and I can walk the track ... he's happy and I'm getting exercise while getting work done.

I also dictate while driving, which I know might be controversial, but before I got a phone I was writing all my notes long-hand in my lap on a notebook. Tell me which is more dangerous! I don't actually look at the screen while I'm dictating, which often makes for some funny untangling of words later on, but I can just talk and talk stream of consciousness style, and end up with something I can work with later.

When the file is done or when I get home, I just send the note to my email box. Then I grab it and put it in the correct project file on my laptop (you might be more progressive and use Google Docs).

You could dictate while nursing your baby, while making dinner, while folding laundry or waiting for your kid to get out of a drama rehearsal.

*This post was 511 words and I cranked it out super fast over our Homeschool Lunch Break, then edited later.

I would LOVE to hear how this works out for you or if you already do it!

Have files of article reprints that you own but have no clue where to start reselling them? Have ideas for some fantastic new pieces but no idea who might want them? Check out my 386-page PDF of tips, tricks, and insider information, as well as 384 paying parenting and family markets for only $9.99! Just head to this page to download How to Get Published (and Paid!) Writing About Your Kids and get started immediately!

Sign up for an email subscription to The Published Parent and get two amazing freebies: 10 Parenting Markets That Pay $100+ and 10 Markets That Pay Writers to Write About Writing! And join my Facebook group called Parenting Magazine Writers ... it's FREE and full of tips and tricks and markets and like-minded writer friends!

17 Tips to Get More Blog Traffic (updated and growing!)



So I've been trolling some blogs and want to give some tips. These are some recent changes I've made on a few of my own blogs that seem to have made a difference:

  1. Head to LinkWithin and sign up. This is how I get those boxes below each post that suggest other pages readers might want to view. This is a great way to get people to explore your blog and other posts they might like. More page views = more ad money sometimes.
  2. When you're ready, apply at BlogHer to get some ads, which don't pay by clicks, but by page views.
  3. Have tabs along the top of your blog. If you can't figure out how to do this, just ask me and I'll post the html code I use for Blogger in a special blog post for everyone.
  4. Go to AddThis and sign up. I have seen my posts tweeted and shared a ton since I did this and put it at the top of my blogs. Also, it makes it easy for YOU to quickly tweet any post from the past you might want to direct readers to again. AddThis sends you a weekly update on your viral lift and shows how just one share can lead to so many clicks.
  5. Make sure you have a Twitter account, and link it everywhere! To gain followers, FOLLOW!
  6. Have a Facebook page dedicated to your site, be it a blog or a business or whatever. Sign up for Networked Blogs.
  7. I was sending out my entire blog posts to email subscribers but have changed that so now they get a few lines only. I am a bloggy tease, it is true, but I get more traffic because my email subs now have to come to the blog to see the post ... and are more likely to comment and stick around a while.
  8. Oh, and I like to put the popular posts down the side, as well. I like to personally see what people are checking out so I can give them more of the same. 
  9. Get a Google+ account. When I make updates to posts I have the option of sending the post out to all my Google+ people, which are often different from my other social media contacts.
  10. Make sure you are on LinkedIn. Connect accounts so your Twitter posts post on your LinkedIn wall, etc.
  11. If you are a writer, make sure your site is showing up in your byline on any articles you write.
  12. Sign up at Feedburner. I did this a long time ago, but didn't have it set up correctly and was missing out on tons of traffic somehow (don't ask me how it works, just that you can get a widget to see how many people are checking out your site using a feed). Make sure you check out the "Optimize" and "Publicize" tabs and activate all you can!
  13. Grab yourself a Facebook Like button for your site so people can Like from afar. You can do that here.
  14. Don't try to be someone you are not. Be yourself, and that may take you a little time to put into practice. It took me almost FOUR YEARS to start seeing decent traffic.
  15. Hit some blog hops, and make sure you are also checking out other blogs. You can't just sit back and wait for everyone to come to you but never visit another person!
  16. Get a Hootsuite account (free version) and schedule some love for your posts so they are not rotting. You know you have some great content that is old and needs some new social media life. And maybe a new graphic as well?
  17. Get something like CommentLuv so comments link back to a person's email and website. It's also cool to be able to reply to a specific comment instead of across-the-board like you currently have to do on Facebook.
  18. Hop on Quora.com and start answering questions people have ... answer in part and then send them to a blog post you have written on the topic :)
Have files of article reprints that you own but have no clue where to start reselling them? Have ideas for some fantastic new pieces but no idea who might want them? Check out my 386-page PDF of tips, tricks, and insider information, as well as 384 paying parenting and family markets for only $9.99! Just head to this page to download How to Get Published (and Paid!) Writing About Your Kids and get started immediately!

Sign up for an email subscription to The Published Parent and get two amazing freebies: 10 Parenting Markets That Pay $100+ and 10 Markets That Pay Writers to Write About Writing! And join my Facebook group called Parenting Magazine Writers ... it's FREE and full of tips and tricks and markets and like-minded writer friends!

Thursday, September 7, 2017

The Nifty 15 by Honoree Corder and My 100 Days Chart

I have a new writer girl crush and her name is Honoree Corder. You can check out The Nifty 15: Write Your Book in Just 15 Minutes a Day here and then I suggest you also follow her on Amazon so you always know when she comes out with something new. While I'm driving home from taking my teens to jobs and countless activities, I am also reading/listening to her Prosperity for Writers and You Must Write a Book.


Here's the review I left for this book, but please know that I am also planning on applying this to my article writing as well. Fifteen minutes a day carved out just for that purpose would yield an article every couple of weeks pretty easily. That could mean 12-24 articles for your stable of articles every year, depending on if you are writing quick regional parenting pieces or longer, national pieces that require queries. Every single year! You are not some flash in the pan writer ... you are in this for the long haul and you need to write every day to keep up the habit.

"Just the kick I needed. Yes, I already have a couple of books I have self-published and I did those in increments of whenever-the-baby-is-sleeping or early-in-the-morning until I couldn't think anymore. Lately I'm finding it harder to focus and needed a set amount of time to just sit and do it. And know that I had done it that day and that I didn't have to do anymore. But once I get started, it's like sex ... you get going and you want to keep going. I'm excited to see what happens with each of my projects in 100-day sets. I found a 100 days of school graphic/game that I printed out to color in each day that I do what I'm supposed to do. I'm actually coloring in every 15 minutes I do. I could do days or increments, either one works to make progress. I just like to see that I'm doing SOMETHING; otherwise it's easier to only do my proofreading work or find excuses to watch Scandal. Rock on, Honoree! Moving on to your next book and the next ... thank you!"

So instead of making my own thing from scratch, I Googled "100 Days Writing Chart" and came up with a 100 days of school chart! It printed a little grainy but it will work for my purposes. If I miss a day, I have to write for 15 extra the next day. I printed one out for each project. I'd love to have a full hour a day to work on 4 different projects because it's hard for me to focus on just one thing to completion, but we all work differently :-)


Have files of article reprints that you own but have no clue where to start reselling them? Have ideas for some fantastic new pieces but no idea who might want them? Check out my 386-page PDF of tips, tricks, and insider information, as well as 384 paying parenting and family markets for only $9.99! Just head to this page to download How to Get Published (and Paid!) Writing About Your Kids and get started immediately!

Sign up for an email subscription to The Published Parent and get two amazing freebies: 10 Parenting Markets That Pay $100+ and 10 Markets That Pay Writers to Write About Writing! And join my Facebook group called Parenting Magazine Writers ... it's FREE and full of tips and tricks and markets and like-minded writer friends!

Tuesday, September 5, 2017

Write Timely Articles Parenting Magazine Editors Want to Purchase


As parenting magazine writers, we all need ideas for articles to write about all year long.

Do you feel like you have written everything you have to say on the topic of birthday parties or camp or holidays?

Need some inspiration because your brain has run dry?

Check out this site. Turns out there are not only those obvious and popular things we knew about like Valentine's Day in February, but also things that should be on our radar like Black History Month ... and did you know that February 20 is Love Your Pet Day? What a great time to whip out that piece about whether or not your kid should get a pet. Or maybe you sold it in December about getting a pet for Christmas and it just needs a little tweak and a re-send.

To me, this is writing idea GOLD. I am brainstorming like crazy because the regionals work a few months ahead. Some have their editorial calendar all laid out for the whole YEAR, but I get quite a few last-minute assignments, so it  never hurts to have some of these babies in your stable of articles.

Now get your butt in your seat and WRITE! Or, you can try what I do and dictate into your phone while you are driving or walking for exercise or waiting for kids to come out of something. At least get the ideas down and they will start ruminating in your head and turn into an article with a little research, maybe a human quote or two, and a lot of crafting and care.


Have files of article reprints that you own but have no clue where to start reselling them? Have ideas for some fantastic new pieces but no idea who might want them? Check out my 386-page PDF of tips, tricks, and insider information, as well as 384 paying parenting and family markets for only $9.99! Just head to this page to download How to Get Published (and Paid!) Writing About Your Kids and get started immediately!

Sign up for an email subscription to The Published Parent and get two amazing freebies: 10 Parenting Markets That Pay $100+ and 10 Markets That Pay Writers to Write About Writing! And join my Facebook group called Parenting Magazine Writers ... it's FREE and full of tips and tricks and markets and like-minded writer friends!

Sunday, September 3, 2017

Time Management for Writers at Home



Tonight I was doing random household tasks and thinking about how much writing and proofreading work I still had to do. I thought about all the laundry, dishes, homeschooling, meals, phone calls, errands and details I handle or take care of every day and how often people are amazed that I can crank out articles and ebooks while (mostly) keeping my sanity, maintaining marriage and having a blast with my kids.

And it came to me.

We all have the same amount of time every day to with what we want/need to do.

So how do I fit it all in?

SLEEP
I start by making sure I get enough sleep so I am in premium condition. I don't try to get by on 6 hours when I know I need 7-8 to be a kind, functioning human being.

PLAN MEALS
I plan our meals in advance so I'm not scrambling at the last minute for something for us to eat. I try to double meals when I make them so I have another in the freezer for another time.

WORK SANDWICH
I do a chunk of my work in the morning when the kids are asleep, then fill up the Attention Tanks of my kids the rest of the day. At night when they are worn out and watching a movie, I flop down by them with my laptop and crank out another hour or so of work.

FOCUS!
I do things as fast as I can and try to focus on one task at a time. It's hard! But if I keep getting distracted, ADD-style, the job takes FOREVER! I put my phone out of sight and turn it off!

MAKE A LIST
I keep a list in pencil of everything I need/want to do and put a number priority next to each thing up to only 10. As I finish something, I erase it. That leaves room for something else to fill its spot, but hopefully only after I've finished two more things!!!! Update: I use Pilot FriXion Clicker Retractable Erasable Gel Pens now and use a cheap spiral notebook for a bullet journal!

GET HELP
Oh, and of course I have the kids help out around the house. After all, I'm working to pay for gymnastics and other fun things, so they can certainly toss the dry laundry in a basket and bring it up to my bedroom, right?

I'd love to hear how you get it all done! Even if your kids are in school during the day while you work from home (or maybe they are up and out of the house), I'm pretty sure you still have some challenges with keeping on task. How do you power through?

Please consider signing up for an email subscription to this site and get two amazing freebies: 10 Parenting Markets That Pay $100+ and 10 Markets That Pay Writers to Write About Writing! Please also consider joining my Facebook group called Parenting Magazine Writers ... it's FREE and full of tips and tricks and markets and like-minded writer friends!

Check out my 386-page PDF of tips, tricks, and insider information, as well as 384 paying markets for only $9.99! Just head to this page to download it and get started immediately! :-) I wish you success!


Friday, September 1, 2017

How to Use HootSuite to Schedule Social Media for FREE!


It didn't take me long to figure out that social media was where a lot of my traffic was coming from for blogging and other writing. I used to write at Bubblews before they went defunct, where my pay was based on views, likes and comments, and I needed to get the word out about pieces I wrote or I didn't make much money. 

I knew I couldn't sit on Twitter or Facebook or other social media all day spamming my followers with message after message ... I don't want to alienate my readers!

Solution: HootSuite!

It's free! (unless you want the fancy version that gives you all the reports)

Here's what you do:

1. Go to HootSuite and sign up.

2. Add your FIVE social networks that you send info to the most. Options include Twitter, Facebook, G+, LinkedIn, FourSquare, WordPress. I have a little owl icon at the top of my toolbar in Chrome. I click on him and then choose up to five different places to send my post or message. I usually choose my Facebook fan page for The Kerrie Show for general items because I have that set up to also automatically tweet everything that hits there.

Sometimes I pick other places to send my message, like to my Homeschooling Mommybot Facebook fan page or to the fan page for THIS blog!

3. Find a post you want some love on.

4. Add an image if it doesn't already show up on the HootSuite box.

5. HootSuite shortens the link for you! Then you can tailor the message if you like.

6. Click on the calendar to schedule your message for whenever you want it to hit. I do love, however, the Auto Schedule option, which takes it out of your hands and spaces messages far enough apart so as to not spam your followers, plus it apparently sends messages at optimal times somehow.

Talk about making money while you sleep! You could schedule a bunch of tweets overnight for your worldwide fan base and wake up with a nice amount in your AdSense account or find that affiliate links have been clicked or, like used to happen for me, that your Bubblews amount increased incredibly!

If this post confounds you, just check on YouTube because there are how-to videos that show you step-by-step ways to set this up and use it.

Have files of article reprints that you own but have no clue where to start reselling them? Have ideas for some fantastic new pieces but no idea who might want them? Check out my 386-page PDF of tips, tricks, and insider information, as well as 384 paying parenting and family markets for only $9.99! Just head to this page to download How to Get Published (and Paid!) Writing About Your Kids and get started immediately!


Sign up for an email subscription to The Published Parent and get two amazing freebies: 10 Parenting Markets That Pay $100+ and 10 Markets That Pay Writers to Write About Writing! And join my Facebook group called Parenting Magazine Writers ... it's FREE and full of tips and tricks and markets and like-minded writer friends!

Wednesday, July 5, 2017

Pregnancy and Newborn Magazine Submission Writers Guidelines



Freelance Writers
We’re glad you’re interested in the prospect of working with Pregnancy & Newborn magazine—we’re always looking to add to our pool of writers and are currently accepting freelance submissions! Please read and follow the guidelines below so you can query us effectively and we can respond efficiently.

First, familiarize yourself with Pregnancy & Newborn both in print and online. Our targeted audience is comprised of women who are expecting or have a child under the age of 1. We strive to provide insightful, informative articles that discuss all things pregnancy- and baby-related in a casual, conversational, girlfriend-to-girlfriend manner. As a national magazine, we cover topics that are relevant to pregnant and new moms across the country.


Each month, we print articles that fit into the following categories: prenatal health, prenatal nutrition, emotional well-being, labor & delivery, infant care and parenting. Examples of topics that might be of interest include, but are not limited to, baby’s development month by month, alternative pain relief during labor, choosing a name for baby, healthy snacks for hungry moms-to-be, postpartum depression, maternity leave, finding childcare, vaccinations, raising a bilingual baby and more. We’re always looking for new and creative story ideas—please send yours our way!

We prefer to receive queries via email; you may direct them to editor@pnmag.com. Please send a detailed description of your proposed article, including topics you’ll discuss, experts you’ll interview, and sidebars you’ll provide. Department articles are typically 750 to 1,000 words plus 2 sidebars; feature articles are usually 1,750 to 2,000 plus 4 to 5 sidebars. Keep in mind that we generally work under a 4 to 6 month lead-time.

We appreciate when you include clips of your previously published articles. It’s always nice to see the work you’ve done in the past.

Please be patient as you wait for our response. Oftentimes we may not have a spot for your story immediately, but will file it away to have on hand when an opportunity arises—and rest assured that when one does, we'll be in touch!

Have files of article reprints that you own but have no clue where to start reselling them? Have ideas for some fantastic new pieces but no idea who might want them? Check out my 386-page PDF of tips, tricks, and insider information, as well as 384 paying parenting and family markets for only $9.99! Just head to this page to download How to Get Published (and Paid!) Writing About Your Kids and get started immediately!

Sign up for an email subscription to The Published Parent and get two amazing freebies: 10 Parenting Markets That Pay $100+ and 10 Markets That Pay Writers to Write About Writing! And join my Facebook group called Parenting Magazine Writers ... it's FREE and full of tips and tricks and markets and like-minded writer friends!

Tuesday, July 4, 2017

How to Make an Extra $2,000 Per Month From Home ... the Answer is Not Sexy



People ask me all the time how I bring in an average of $2,000 per month working from home while also homeschooling 5 kids and leading an active life (walking almost every day, taking the kids all sorts of cool places, going on dates with my husband, etc.). They don't think they could ever do it.

Honestly, the answer is not sexy or intriguing and I don't have any life hacks. Here is the "secret" ... It's waking up early and working when I don't want to work.

I WANT to laze around in bed every morning, sleeping as late as I can. Instead, I get up at 6:00 every morning so I have time to pray, make coffee, and then get to work ... while the kids are sleeping.

I WANT to binge-watch entire seasons of shows in a week while my kids sleep in during the morning time. Instead I watch one episode of a favorite show maybe once a week or as a reward to myself for finishing a big project.

I WANT to read books at night. Instead I am happy reading when I can sneak it in ... and listening to audiobooks while I walk (multitasking!). I'm a proofreader by trade, so I get plenty of reading time in.

I WANT to feel less rushed socially and be able to mingle and form relationships, but instead I really need to get home to turn in that article or that proofreading job or work on that book.

I only work an average of 2 hours per day (some days I work 4, morning and night, and some I work just a bit). Doesn't sound like much, does it? But that's 60 hours in a month I am not watching TV, reading, lazing around, napping, and generally hanging out. And that's just during the school year when my focus is on homeschooling.

I cook easy meals for my family, the kids help with chores, I do laundry in a simple fashion (I honestly don't separate types or colors and never have) and I cut corners other ways to make time for the important things I want to do other than working: spending time with my family and cultivating friendships. See my post on Time Management for Writers!

Yes, everyone needs down time. I grab mine in the form of what I mentioned above ... in little bits of reading, TV, podcasts and books and music while I walk, lunch dates with my husband, the zoo with my kids. I also recharge every week at Mass :-)

And yes, after a few months of this pace, I burn out a little bit and need a day to just do nothing ... put on a movie or two for the kids and just take a nap, turn off the phone, grab a book, and say no to everything and everyone for my own sanity. Update: my son had an outpatient surgery and wanted me to just hang with him watching The Walking Dead for a couple of days and you bet your butt I cleared my schedule to do that with him!

This might not work for you, and you might not be a writer-type like I am. You might need to make a lot more money (I am blessed to have a husband with a full-time job so making this much works for our family). You might only be able to carve out one hour a day. I'm telling you if you carve out 15 minutes a day to do something like write a book, you will have a finished product at some point. If you carve out ZERO, you will have ZERO.

All I know is the cubicle life was not for me for a variety of reasons and being with my kids and husband as much as possible was a goal of mine since birth! So I prayed and Googled and asked around and somehow made it happen. I believe you can also!

I'd love to hear from you in the Comments section ... do you work from home or want to? How do you do it or plan to? How much time can you realistically devote to it? How are you going to find business ... clients you love that you can work with long term?


Have files of article reprints that you own but have no clue where to start reselling them? Have ideas for some fantastic new pieces but no idea who might want them? Check out my 386-page PDF of tips, tricks, and insider information, as well as 384 paying parenting and family markets for only $9.99! Just head to this page to download How to Get Published (and Paid!) Writing About Your Kids and get started immediately!

Sign up for an email subscription to The Published Parent and get two amazing freebies: 10 Parenting Markets That Pay $100+ and 10 Markets That Pay Writers to Write About Writing! And join my Facebook group called Parenting Magazine Writers ... it's FREE and full of tips and tricks and markets and like-minded writer friends!

Monday, July 3, 2017

Get Published, Paid and Sell Those Reprints to Regional Parenting Magazines


In 2006 or so, I started writing for regional parenting magazines. The success I've had since has been amazing! Here's what happened ...
  1. I could not comprehend something a friend was doing (grocery shopping daily with small kids).  At that time I had 3 small kids of my own and had to stock up on food because grocery shopping with my kids while my husband was out of town quite frankly sucked.
  2. I wrote out my thoughts (I'm a huge journaler) and they eventually turned into something resembling what I had seen in my local parenting magazine, Kansas City Parent.
  3. I emailed my piece to KC Parent and they bought it for $25. I was thrilled! I was PUBLISHED and PAID!
  4. Then I realized these magazines must be everywhere. I had traveled a little and had seen similar magazines with similar articles.
  5. I didn't have internet at home, so I started to head to the library with or without small children whenever I could and borrowed the internet of friends during playdates. I searched online for other magazines in other cities and started emailing them my pieces.
  6. I started selling articles!
  7. I started writing more articles, usually based on things that I felt passionately about. My best-selling piece, Christmas Sanity (goes by several different titles at this point), sold close to $1,000 in reprints and is still selling (click link to see the others that have sold over $500 in reprints so far). It was written out of my struggle with continuing to travel for Christmas to see extended family on Christmas Day or stay home with my own little family.
  8. I figured other writers might want to know what I had found out, so I wrote a book in 2009 about how to get published in regional parenting magazines and sell each article as a REPRINT again and again. I compiled information from dozens of magazines in one spot to help myself with the submissions process.
This book has been compared to Writer's Market, only if you pick up a copy of that resource you'll see they only have a HANDFUL of parenting markets. I am working on finding 300 for the 7th edition.

I have updated this book every year and now I have over 160 publishing credits under my belt (list is here so you can check it out) and am still writing. It's a great business to be in because I can take a long break to do proofreading projects or write books or work on my direct sales businesses and then always come back to it. Even without writing any new pieces for many months, my reprints keep selling.

If you aren't sure yet, join my Facebook group! I never want to try to sell you something you don't need, so join in the group and check it out first! And happy writing!

Check out my 386-page PDF of tips, tricks, and insider information, as well as 384 paying markets for only $19.99! Just head to this page :-) I wish you success!


You can sign up for an email subscription to this site and get a free sample of the book, including FIVE markets that pay $50 plus for reprints!


Saturday, July 1, 2017

Boston Parents Paper Submission Guidelines



BOSTON PARENTS PAPER (locals only)
Norwood, MA – monthly                                              bostonparentspaper.com
Phone: 617-522-1515                                 cheryl.crosby@bostonparentspaper.com
GuidelinesThe Boston Parents Paper has no formal guidelines, but generally never works with writers who live outside of our region. Department length pieces should be no more than 1,000 words, while features should be no more than 1,600-1,800 words in most cases. We consider queries, but for the most part we do not accept reprints. We do usually require a Resource List (as a sidebar) at the end of any major department article or feature with books, websites and organizations readers can turn to for more information. We also like sidebars or boxes with bulleted tips offering parents real, actionable steps toward solving a particular problem or dealing with an issue.
Approximate pay: We pay anywhere from $100-4oo.


Have files of article reprints that you own but have no clue where to start reselling them? Have ideas for some fantastic new pieces but no idea who might want them? Check out my 386-page PDF of tips, tricks, and insider information, as well as 384 paying parenting and family markets for only $9.99! Just head to this page to download How to Get Published (and Paid!) Writing About Your Kids and get started immediately!

Sign up for an email subscription to The Published Parent and get two amazing freebies: 10 Parenting Markets That Pay $100+ and 10 Markets That Pay Writers to Write About Writing! And join my Facebook group called Parenting Magazine Writers ... it's FREE and full of tips and tricks and markets and like-minded writer friends!

Friday, June 30, 2017

Alaska Parent Magazine Submission Writers Guidelines


Alaska Parent magazine is looking for freelance writers who demonstrate a fresh, engaging writing style and a keen sense of the topics that matter to local parents. Before you pitch a story to us, we recommend you learn more about our publication and get a feel for the type of articles we value and promote.

ABOUT ALASKA PARENT

Alaska Parent is a free, full-color family and parenting magazine, published 4 times per year. As Alaska’s exclusive, all-in-one parenting resource, our readers include parents with children ages newborn through teens, as well as expectant moms. We publish several stories in each issue, from hard-hitting articles on serious topics to pieces designed for fun and entertainment. Our writing tone is easy-to-read and conversational, yet packed with plenty of punch. Through our pages, we want our readers to feel understood, supported and empowered to make healthy parenting and life choices.

WHAT WE ARE LOOKING FOR

We’re looking for lively, well-written stories that cover all stages of parenting. We look for pieces covering local interests, health & wellness, pregnancy & babies, education, travel, hands-on activities, seasonal interests, parental involvement, family fun, as well as “how-to” articles that will make family life easier.
We are currently seeking: 
• Feature stories 
(800-1,200 words). Must include a local focus, and require, at a minimum, three interviews with local experts and/or parents.
• Short feature stories (500-800 words). Must include a local focus, and require, at a minimum, two interviews with local experts and/or parents.
• Tips (150-600 words). Written in first-person, help make a parent’s life easier by sharing creative ideas and solutions to everyday challenges, including (but not limited to): organization, scheduling, parenting, relationships, traveling, birthdays, holidays and more.

QUERIES

We welcome story pitches, especially from local freelancers. These queries should be emailed toeditor@alaskaparent.com. We do not accept queries through the mail or fax. You may send multiple queries.
Your query should be no more than 4 paragraphs and include:
• What is the focus of the story? A brief summary written in the style of your proposed piece.
• What are some of the key points you will cover and the sources you will interview?
• Answer the "so what?" Why is this story important to our readers? Why should you be the one to tell it?
• What is the anticipated word length?
• If you have not written for us before, include 2-3 writing samples along with your query. Links to online stories are preferable, but PDFs are ok too.
• Include your full mailing address, phone number and email address.

UNSOLICITED ARTICLES

Alaska Parent welcomes unsolicited articles that meet our story requirements. Send the complete article to editor@alaskaparent.com. If we are interested in your article, we will contact you prior to publication to negotiate an acceptable rate and obtain permission for use.

REPRINTS

We are interested in fresh material so reprints are less likely to be accepted. However, you may send us a reprint if you feel it fits perfectly with our magazine. Include the date, previous publisher and what rights they may have to the article. We may ask if we can insert local sources/content. We do require market (Alaska) exclusivity.

RESPONSE TIME

Due to the high volume of queries/submissions and frequencies of our publications, our response time can take several weeks. Often we consider story ideas for several issues and may delay the publication of some stories for seasonal reasons. However, if you do not hear from us after 3 months of your submission, it is safe to assume that we have decided to pass. Please feel free to pitch us a new idea. If your query/submission is accepted, we will email you an acceptance letter that specifies deadline, word count and writer’s fee.

PUBLICATION RIGHTS

With the exception of reprints, we purchase all rights to articles, including the option to republish articles in special editions or post them online at www.AlaskaParent.com. (If you do not want your article to appear on our web site, do not submit it to our magazine.)

PAYMENT

Payment is negotiated per article and depends on the complexity of subject, the length of the article and the writer’s level of professional experience and/or track record writing for us. For original articles, we generally pay $40-$200. For reprints, we generally pay $25-$40; however, authors willing to localize their reprints with interviews with local parents and experts can expect more. If your submission is accepted, you should submit an invoice (within an email is fine) that includes name, address, phone number, name of story and payment amount. Payment shall be due within 30 days after the print date of the publication.

PHOTOS

Photographs grab readers’ attention, so we want to include them whenever possible. If you have photos or leads for photos, please pass that information along as early in the writing process as possible.

EDITORIAL DISCRETION

All submissions are subject to editorial review and approval by Alaska Parent and may be edited for grammar, clarity, brevity and tone. If major revisions are needed, you will be contacted. For reprints, local content/comments may be added. We reserve the right to reject an article at any stage before publication.
Have files of article reprints that you own but have no clue where to start reselling them? Have ideas for some fantastic new pieces but no idea who might want them? Check out my 386-page PDF of tips, tricks, and insider information, as well as 384 paying parenting and family markets for only $9.99! Just head to this page to download How to Get Published (and Paid!) Writing About Your Kids and get started immediately!

Sign up for an email subscription to The Published Parent and get two amazing freebies: 10 Parenting Markets That Pay $100+ and 10 Markets That Pay Writers to Write About Writing! And join my Facebook group called Parenting Magazine Writers ... it's FREE and full of tips and tricks and markets and like-minded writer friends!


Thursday, June 29, 2017

Chesapeake Family Submission Guidelines



Are you a local writer who's interested in topics that relate to family life in the Chesapeake region? Send an introductory e-mail to our editor. Please include a specific story idea, a list of previously published work and one writing clip. 

Chesapeake Family is a free, monthly parenting publication serving Anne Arundel, Calvert, Bowie and Upper Marlboro areas of Prince George’s and Kent Island area in Queen Anne’s counties of Maryland.
Who Our Readers Are
We have a circulation of about 40,000 with an estimated 90,000 readers. They get the magazine at schools, libraries, doctors’ offices, grocery stores and toy stores. Our readers are parents (mostly moms) of children from the cradle to college age. They’re well educated and strive to do the best for their children even as they juggle busy lives and try to watch their budgets. They tend to pick up Chesapeake Family initially for the calendar of monthly activities and the sections on health and education. We also have an increasing web presence that now exceeds our print audience. Many print stories are used online, though fresh content is added to the website daily.
What We’re About
Our goal is to make our readers’ everyday lives easier by anticipating the sort of information they will need, identifying and sifting through available resources and gathering it for them so they can just read it and go. We strive to present unique stories that readers won’t find in any other local publication.
Our Writing Approach
Our readers may have only 5 minutes over a slice of toast to glance at the magazine so we want to use an easy-to-read, accessible tone but also pack plenty of punch into the few words we use. Through our pages, we want our readers to feel understood, supported and empowered to make healthy parenting and life choices.
What We’re Looking For
  • We are looking for professional writers who are conscientious and fact check their work.
  • Our articles are short (about 1,000 words for a feature and 750 for a column) so pick your main theme and develop it well. Know the main point you want the reader to take away and present it clearly.
  • Talk to three local sources considered authorities on the topic at hand.
  • Perform all the legwork for the reader and list local resources, answering the obvious questions: Where? When? How much? Whom can I call? What’s the number?
  • Our magazine serves readers outside of Annapolis (see Who We Are above) so be sure to talk to authorities and include resources in other areas as well.
  • Where appropriate, use local, real-life situations and people to illustrate your topic.
  • We generally do not run first person or personal essays unless they are unusually compelling.
  • We are also particularly in the market for local travel stories, “local” being everywhere in Virginia, Maryland, D.C., Delaware and Pennsylvania. While features on other locations are a possibility, we try to stay as local as possible. We will pay extra for good-quality high resolution photos.
What We Pay
For assigned articles, our pay range is $75-200, with articles that require more research at the higher rate. We pay around $35 for reprints but note that we try not to overlap coverage with other parenting publications in the region- however, authors willing to localize their reprints with interviews with local parents and experts can expect more. We do not, as a rule, pay for travel expenses or for mileage; however, we will do our best to assist you in getting press tickets or rates for events/locations/etc. Articles are subject to editing for space and clarity. We pay a kill fee of $25 for stories cut due to space requirements; stories cut because they do not meet CF’s standards will receive no compensation. Should a story not meet the editor’s satisfaction, though, she will do her best to work with you to make the story acceptable for inclusion. Stories moved to online-only status due to space will receive their full payment. Chesapeake Family buys one-time print rights and exclusive online rights for three months.
Deadlines and Submissions
Articles are due on the 15th of the month, two months before the publication issue (so articles for the July issue are due on May 15, for example). Please submit your article with a creative title/headline suggestion and 1-2 sentence tagline to run at the end. Articles may be submitted as a Word attachment and/or embedded in an e-mail. Attach a separate invoice that includes your name, address, phone number, e-mail address, social security number, the date, title of article and agreed-upon rate.
Unsolicited Articles
We will consider unsolicited articles, but we have very limited space. We encourage writers, especially local ones, who feel strongly that they have a story for Chesapeake Family to send a query/outline.
Contacting Us
Preferred method of contact is via e-mail at editor at chesapeakefamily dot com.

Have files of article reprints that you own but have no clue where to start reselling them? Have ideas for some fantastic new pieces but no idea who might want them? Check out my 386-page PDF of tips, tricks, and insider information, as well as 384 paying parenting and family markets for only $9.99! Just head to this page to download How to Get Published (and Paid!) Writing About Your Kids and get started immediately!

Sign up for an email subscription to The Published Parent and get two amazing freebies: 10 Parenting Markets That Pay $100+ and 10 Markets That Pay Writers to Write About Writing! And join my Facebook group called Parenting Magazine Writers ... it's FREE and full of tips and tricks and markets and like-minded writer friends!